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TalkStory

Home is where your hat hangs .....

Home is where your hat hangs .....

 conner hats tonga chasing the sun

A good hat is the perfect travel companion: it will dutifully serve as a disguise, a makeshift pillow, essential elemental protection, or as your little personal raffia thatched bungalow to snooze away in on a tropical beach somewhere far far away.

We sent our resident hat testers to Tonga to see how Conner Hats hold up in the sunny South Pacific.

Stay tuned for more from their hatventures.

*Don't forget to share your #hatstory with us on social media

Photography by the illustrious Ming Nomchong 

 www.mingnomchong.com

www.mingnomchong.com

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You know what they say about people with big heads?

You know what they say about people with big heads?

heads hats conner   They have big hats! According to National Geographic, our heads are getting bigger --- and they don't mean that as a figure of speech. "New measurements of hundreds of skulls of white Americans born between 1825 and 1985 suggest that their typical noggin height has grown by about a third of an inch (eight millimeters). It may not sound like much, but the growth translates to roughly a tennis ball's worth of new brain room. "I can't guess the implications of this jump in cranial size, but other research shows a bigger cranium doesn't necessarily mean more intellect," said University of Tennessee biological anthropologist Richard Jantz, who presented the findings with colleagues at an American Association for Physical Anthropology meeting in April. Ups and Downs of Evolution Beginning with the dawn of the first Homo species, human skulls evolved to be increasingly bigger until about 30,000 years ago, when head size plateaued. And about 5,000 or 6,000 years ago, when agriculture took off in earnest, skulls began shrinking. The cause of the shrinkage is a mystery, but scientists have tentatively fingered more efficient brain wiring and easier access to food and safety—the idea being that people no longer had to be especially smart to survive (aka the Idiocracytheory). About ten years ago Jantz and colleagues were measuring skeletons and saw signs that the shrinking trend may be reversing. Since then, they've amassed data on 1,500 skulls spanning 160 years. The specimens came from three collections to which only adult skeletons could be donated. And since mostly adult Caucasian Americans regularly donated to the collections, the researchers' conclusions so far are known to apply to that group alone. Americans Experimenting on Themselves? Jantz cautioned that American life has changed in too many ways to pinpoint a single cause for the skull growth. "I am absolutely certain, however, that it's due to the unparalleled environment that we now live in," he said. "Americans drive cars, vaccinate their children—and an excess of food is now a bigger problem than undernutrition, among many other things. It's almost as if we're conducting an experiment on ourselves to see how we'll respond to a totally new environment." University of Texas demographer Corey Sparks said the new conclusions seem to be valid but was equally cautious not to suggest an exact cause." ........ Need help figuring out your hat size? Check out our DIY sizing guide

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